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The complexities of place and time (access required)

proofread

One of the consequences of living in a flyover state is that people in big-media cities like New York and Washington, D.C. remain chronically unclear about our local geography. Exhibit A: The D.C.-area public relations firm which had to send the same press release three times before getting critical dates and place names straight.

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Ahoy polloi! (access required)

life-preserver

When you’re rich enough to afford a six-figure membership to an exclusive yacht club, perhaps such elementary concepts like the difference between “use” and “buy” become meaningless details. Or maybe you figure somebody will actually read the documents you sign.

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Ban sags under constitutional concerns (access required)

As expected, the weight of legal scrutiny bogged down Dunn’s saggy pants ban. Dunn City Attorney Tilghman Pope told the city council last week that his research into the proposed ban had unearthed too many legal obstacles and that he had drafted no proposal. The council had asked Pope earlier to explore the possibilities of a ban of low-riding trousers.

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Step One: Cite the libel in your libel suit (access required)

Being a criminal prosecutor is not the same thing as being an expert on libel law, and a spate of bad press is not the same thing as actual malice. Ousted Durham County District Attorney Tracey Cline may learn a thing about both of these points after filing a pro se complaint for libel against the Raleigh News & Observer on September 4.

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Give him an ‘A’ for effort (access required)

You’ve gotta hand it to a convicted drug dealer and his North Carolina attorney for coming up with a novel defense to a blatant probation violation, even though their argument failed. Graham solo Todd A. Smith tried to convince an Alamance County Superior Court judge that his client couldn’t be punished for violating the terms of his probation because he’d walked out of a busy courthouse before anyone in the probation office had a chance to process him.

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