Quantcast
Home / News / News Story (page 34)

News Story

NC lawyers question thoroughness of outsourced title search (access required)

Outsourcing is nothing new, and businesses have been outsourcing certain operations to India for years. But property and property law in North Carolina, for the most part, is local - at least for now. Still the push is on from industry and, arguably, the federal government to nationalize the attorney-controlled real estate system in the state. A company based in Bangalore, India, has been offering its title abstracting services in North Carolina for at three years, according to its managing partner, M.S. Shridhar.

Read More »

Bill would insert committee into judicial elections (access required)

A measure introduced in the General Assembly last week would create a hybrid system of selecting judges that would combine a screening committee with elections by the public - the first system of its kind in the nation. The legislation was crafted by the NCBA Committee for Judicial Independence, co-chaired by former N.C. Supreme Court Chief Justice Jim Exum and John Wester (pictured), past president of the NCBA. "This bill, if enacted and approved by the people, will greatly improve the way we select judges in North Carolina," Exum said in a prepared statement.

Read More »

Lawyers In The News: April 4, 2011

Lauren S. Thurmond is now a shareholder of Rogers Townsend & Thomas. Thurmond works in the firm’s default services department, representing mortgage lenders, servicers and substitute trustees in foreclosure actions and related litigation. She is licensed in North Carolina and ...

Read More »

Coach’s Corner: Dissolution should not be a firm’s only contingency

Clients clamor for alternatives to hourly rate billing because they want lawyers to have an incentive stake in the outcome of a matter. This is the case with contingency fees, where lawyers get a flat percentage of the value earned for the client. Contingency fees are often used in litigation, from personal injury cases to high-stakes corporate disputes.

Read More »

Commentary: An FHA loan that includes rehabbing costs

America's housing inventory is ballooning with foreclosures and abandoned homes. Short sales, where owners sell their homes for less than what they owe, are commonplace. Also commonplace is that these homes typically need repair or updating. In the last several years, borrowers seeking construction or rehab loans found out that they were hard to come by or that you had to have 20 percent down or equity in a property to get approved. However, one program that has been used for many years, the FHA 203k program, is having a renaissance.

Read More »

Regulators’ nod would bar liability for products (access required)

A sweeping tort-reform bill that would have the effect of preventing product-liability lawsuits in cases where the product got a stamp of approval from government regulators was formally introduced in the state House this week. At a packed hearing, Greensboro attorney Janet Ward Black (pictured) said the product-liability provision in the bill would be the most plaintiff-unfriendly in the country. The bill also incorporates some controversial aspects of a medical-malpractice tort-reform bill under consideration in the Senate.

Read More »

It’s official: Good-faith exception part of state law (access required)

As Rep. Paul Stam, R-Wake, sees it, an injustice to the people of North Carolina has been righted with the passage of an act to provide for the adoption of the good-faith exception to the exclusionary rule into state law. "In some cases, a murderer, rapist or drug dealer will not go free. In other cases, like the victim in State v. Carter, an elderly rape victim won't have to testify twice because of an unjust suppression of evidence," Stam said. But Charlotte criminal defense attorney Bill Powers said the rationale for the exclusionary rule is not to protect guilty criminals.

Read More »