Quantcast
Home / Top Legal News (page 228) /

Top Legal News

Feds want to study feasibility of national land recordation system (access required)

The Department of Housing and Urban Development may be ordered to conduct a study of the feasibility of establishing a federal land recordation system in response to concerns over the performance of the Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems. The proposed study is tacked on the end of the outgoing Congress' H.R. 6460, the Transparency and Security in Mortgage Registration Act of 2010, a bill sponsored by Rep. Marcy Kaptur, D-Ohio.

Read More »

Man must pay jilted fiancée $130K for reneging on engagement (access required)

A McDowell County jury has awarded $130,000 to a woman who was dumped by her fiancé in a breach-of-contract-to-marry claim, a common-law tort that is rarely seen today. The case involved a young woman who worked in her older boyfriend's convenience stores. He asked her to marry him, she accepted, and he told her that they would eventually sell the convenience stores and she would never have to worry about money, according to the plaintiff's attorney, Steven Kropelnicki Jr. (pictured) of Asheville.

Read More »

First-impression: Builder faces personal liability for negligence (access required)

"The corporate veil was not pierced here," Wilmington attorney Ryal Tayloe told Lawyers Weekly. But the president and sole shareholder of Wrightsville Beach-based Collins Building, Inc., will still face plaintiffs in his individual capacity, after the Court of Appeals reversed a New Hanover County Superior Court judge's dismissal of claims against Collins. The Jan. 4 apparent first-impression decision is White v. Collins Bldg., Inc.

Read More »

Large firm leaders say 2010 wasn’t so awful after all (access required)

North Carolina suffered some hard economic punches in 2010, but the state's top law firms weren't knocked out of the ring. In fact, they say they were well-prepared for the fight. Lawyers Weekly surveyed managing partners or other top leaders at 10 of the Tar Heel State's biggest firms to find out how they fared in 2010 and their predictions for 2011.

Read More »

20 things lawyers need to know in 2011 (access required)

Who's the next potential U.S. Supreme Court justice on Obama's list? Why does your firm need a social media policy - and an employee handbook? You will find the answers to these questions and more in this year's edition of "20 Things Lawyers Need to Know," complied by Lawyers USA, Lawyers Weekly's national sister paper. From the hottest technology tools to the latest tips for marketing your practice, we give you the insight you need to run a better law practice in the year ahead.

Read More »

Elon clinic aims to help refugees and asylees stay here (access required)

This year, more than 2,700 refugees arrived in North Carolina seeking a new start in life. On New Year's Day, those in the Triad will find a new agency to help them do it. The Elon University School of Law has established the Humanitarian Immigration Law Clinic, which will provide free legal services to refugees and those seeking asylum in the state. Its doors open Jan. 1. According to Greensboro immigration attorney Gerard Chapman, the timing for the clinic's opening couldn't be better.

Read More »

Copying error leaves county on the hook for just compensation (access required)

Simply Fashion knew in 2000 when it leased space in Freedom Mall on Charlotte's west side that its landlord was trying to sell the space. That's why the lease provided that either the landlord or its successor could terminate the lease on 120 days notice if the mall were sold and switched to nonretail use. When Mecklenburg County bought the mall in 2007 and converted the space for use by county employees, it offered Simply Fashion $21,813 to terminate its lease early. Simply Fashion refused, so the county moved to condemn the store's leasehold interest. It didn't need to do that, said Charlotte attorney Thomas L. Odom Jr. of the Odom Law Firm.

Read More »

Mecklenburg stays on top for NC brownfield redevelopments (access required)

When it comes to air quality, Charlotte is the worst in the state. But the area is environmentally friendly in other ways, particularly when it comes to redeveloping and cleaning brownfields - sites, such as former gasoline stations, that tend to repel developers because of concerns about contamination. Indeed, Charlotte continues to lead North Carolina in brownfield development since being the first city in the state to receive a U.S. Environmental Protection Agency brownfields assessment demonstration grant in 1996.

Read More »

Firms find creative ways to celebrate the season (access required)

Law firms across the state tightened their belts in 2009 after a year of recession-forced layoffs and cutbacks. This year, although the slow economy is still staring the profession in the face, some firms decided to loosen up the purse strings a little, while others continued to scale back. At Smith Moore Leatherwood's Raleigh office, Brad Risinger said the firm wanted to be frugal. "The emphasis is to protect a nice bonus for the staff," said Risinger, the managing partner of the Raleigh office. At the firm's Greensboro office, employees are traditionally treated to a catered lunch. But one of the real hits of the holiday season was attorney Kent Auberry's (pictured) portrayal of Santa Claus.

Read More »

Recount shows McCullough bested Thigpen by wider margin (access required)

A recount of votes requested by Judge Cressie Thigpen Jr. was completed late Monday, with the results showing that Doug McCullough is the winner of the Court of Appeals seat, with the gap between the two widening slightly. McCullough, a former Court of Appeals judge, narrowly edged out Thigpen when the second- and third-place ballots were counted in the instant-runoff election. In the 13-way race to determine the top two vote-getters, Thigpen was in first place with 20.3 percent of the vote compared to McCullough's 15.2 percent.

Read More »